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How to say what are you doing in italian?

Category: How

Author: Dorothy West

Published: 2020-06-30

Views: 553

How to say what are you doing in italian?

Assuming you would like a step-by-step guide on how to say "What are you doing?" in Italian: Step 1: Determine the subject of the sentence. In this case, the subject is "you." Step 2: Choose the correct conjugation of the verb "fare." Since the subject is in the second person singular, you will need to use the conjugation "stai." Step 3: Place the verb before the subject. The word order in Italian is typically Subject-Verb-Object. Step 4: Add any other words that might be necessary to complete the sentence, such as an object. For example, "What are you doing with that book?" would be "Che cosa stai facendo con quel libro?" Putting it all together, the sentence "What are you doing?" in Italian would be "Che cosa stai facendo?"

Learn More: How do you say do you speak italian in italian?

How do you say "what are you doing" in Italian?

In Italian, the phrase “What are you doing?” can be translated in a few different ways. The most literal translation would be “Che cosa stai facendo?”. However, this translation is not commonly used in everyday conversation. A more common way to say “What are you doing?” would be “Che fai?”. This phrase is shorter and more casual.

If you are speaking to someone informally, you could also use the phrase “Che ci fai?”. This translation is even more casual than “Che fai?” and is often used among friends.

These are just a few of the ways that you can say “What are you doing?” in Italian. Depending on the situation, you may need to use a different translation. For example, if you are speaking to someone formally, you would not use the informal phrases “Che cosa stai facendo?” or “Che ci fai?”. In this case, it would be more appropriate to use the phrase “Che cosa sta facendo?”.

When translating “What are you doing?” into Italian, it is important to consider the context in which you will be using the phrase. By doing so, you can ensure that you choose the most appropriate translation.

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How do you say "what are you up to" in Italian?

How do you say "what are you up to" in Italian?

If you want to ask someone what they are up to in Italian, you would say "Che cosa stai facendo?" However, this phrase is not used as often in Italian as it is in English. A more common way to ask this question would be "Che cosa fai?"

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How do you say "what are you doing today" in Italian?

In Italian, you say "Come stai oggi?" to ask "How are you today?" If you want to ask someone what they are doing today, you say "Cosa fai oggi?"

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How do you say "what are you doing tonight" in Italian?

"What are you doing tonight" in Italian can be translated in a few different ways. The most literal translation would be "Che cosa stai facendo questa sera?", but this is not the most common way to say it.

A more common way to say "What are you doing tonight" in Italian would be "Che cosa fai stasera?". This is more of a casual question and would be more appropriate to use with friends or acquaintances.

If you wanted to be more formal, you could ask "Cosa farete questa sera?" This would be more appropriate to use with people who you are not as close with.

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How do you say "what are you doing this weekend" in Italian?

In order to say "What are you doing this weekend" in Italian, you would say "Che cosa stai facendo questo fine settimana?" This is how you would ask someone what their plans are for the upcoming weekend. In Italy, weekends typically consist of spending time with family, friends, and loved ones. Often times, people will have large gatherings or go out to eat together. There are also many cultural events and activities that take place on weekends. Italians typically take advantage of their weekends to relax and enjoy time with those they care about.

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How do you say "what are you doing next week" in Italian?

Ci vediamo la prossima settimana.

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How do you say "what are you doing this month" in Italian?

In Italian, the phrase "What are you doing this month?" is "Che cosa stai facendo questo mese?" The word "che" isItalian for "what," "cosa" is "thing," "stai" is "you are," "facendo" is "doing," and "questo" is "this." "Mese" is the Italian word for "month."

The verb "stare" is conjugated differently in the present tense depending on the subject pronoun. "Stare" is an irregular verb, so its conjugation must be memorized. The conjugation for "stare" in the present tense is as follows:

io sto (I am)

tu stai (you are)

lui/lei sta (he/she is)

noi stiamo (we are)

voi state (you all are)

loro stanno (they are)

When using the verb "stare" in a sentence, the subject pronoun must agree with the verb. For example, the sentence "Io sto parlando con te" would translate to "I am talking to you." In this sentence, the subject pronoun "io" (I) agrees with the verb "sto" (I am).

The phrase "Che cosa stai facendo questo mese?" can be translated to "What are you doing this month?" In this phrase, the subject pronoun "tu" (you) agrees with the verb "stai" (you are).

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How do you say "what are you doing this year" in Italian?

In order to say "what are you doing this year" in Italian, you would say "cosa stai facendo quest'anno". Let's break this down so that we can better understand its meaning. "Cosa" is the Italian word for "what". "Stai facendo" is the Italian phrase for "you are doing". "Quest'anno" means "this year". Therefore, when put together, "cosa stai facendo quest'anno" means "what are you doing this year".

Now that we know how to say "what are you doing this year" in Italian, let's take a look at how we can use this phrase in a sentence. For example, you might say " sto programmando di andare in Italia quest'anno" which means "I am planning on going to Italy this year". In this sentence, we use the Italian word "sto" which means "I am" and then we follow it with the verb "programmando" which means "planning". Next, we use the preposition "di" which means "of" or "about" and then we insert the infinitive verb "andare" which means "to go". Finally, we conclude the sentence with "quest'anno" which, as we know, means "this year".

If you're wondering how to say "what are you doing next year" in Italian, it's actually quite similar. You would say "cosa farai l'anno prossimo" which breaks down to "what will you do next year". In this sentence, we use the verb "fare" which means "to do" and then we add the word "l'anno" which means "the year". Finally, we finish up with "prossimo" which is the Italian word for "next".

So there you have it! Now you know how to say "what are you doing this year" and "what are you doing next year" in Italian.

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How do you say "what are you doing right now" in Italian?

Assuming you would like an essay discussing how to say "what are you doing right now" in Italian:

In Italian, the phrase “what are you doing right now” can be translated to “che cosa stai facendo adesso”. This is said by taking the phrase “what are you doing”, which is “che cosa stai facendo”, and adding the word “adesso”, which means “right now”.

The word “che” in Italian means “what”, “which”, or “who”. It is used as an interrogative pronoun, meaning that it is used to ask questions. The word “cosa” means “thing”, “stuff”, or “affair”. It is a feminine noun, so the article “la” is used in front of it when it is singular. The word “stai” is the second person singular form of the verb “stare”, which means “to stay”, “to stand”, or “to be”. This is conjugated in the present tense, so it would be used when asking what someone is doing right now. The word “facendo” is the present participle of the verb “fare”, which means “to do”, “to make”, or “to cause”. This is put after the verb “stai” to complete the sentence. The word “adesso” means “now”. It is used to denote the present time, so it is placed at the end of the sentence.

When put all together, you get “che cosa stai facendo adesso”, which translates to “what are you doing right now”.

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Related Questions

What are you) *what are you doing in Italian?

*Cosa stai facendo in italian?

How do you ask someone what they are doing in Italian?

Che cosa stai facendo?

Is it OK to say “how are You” in Italian?

Yes, it’s safe to say “how are You” in Italian. However, it’s not the best Italian “how are you?” to use in informal situations.

Should you learn Italian?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the best way to learn a foreign language varies depending on your level of ability and linguistic interests. However, if you are looking for an intensive study program with a teacher who can guide you through challenging courses, then yes—learning Italian could be a great investment.

Is it OK to say “how are You” in Italian?

Yes, it's perfectly acceptable to say "come stai" in Italian.

Is it rude to ask how someone is doing in Italian?

No, it is not rude to ask someone how they are doing in Italian. However, it is polite to wait for an answer before asking again.

How do you say “city” in Italian?

LA CITTA’ (feminine)

How to say “how are You” in Italian?

“Come sta?”

How to say hello in Italian?

Hello, how are you?

What are some examples of being rude in Italian?

1. Not standing up when someone is introduced. 2. Making an obscene hand gesture. 3. Talking loudly without listening to others. 4. Failing to greet people when they meet you in public. 5. Leaving a Saluti before leaving a conversation or meeting, even if you don't want to continue it.

Is it rude to not respect the line in Italy?

Yes, it can be considered rude to not respect the line in Italy. In some cases, this might simply mean trying to overtake a long line of people, but if someone is blatantly ignoring the queue then it could be considered rude.

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