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How do you say merry christmas in norwegian?

Category: How

Author: Carolyn Carson

Published: 2020-01-31

Views: 2014

How do you say merry christmas in norwegian?

Merry Christmas in Norwegian can be translated as either "God Jul" or "Hyggelig Jul". Both phrases are commonly used in Norway. "God Jul" is the more traditional and formal way to say Merry Christmas, while "Hyggelig Jul" is a more warm and informal way to express the same sentiment.

When wishing someone a Merry Christmas in Norwegian, it is common to also say "Godt Nyttår" meaning "Happy New Year". This is typically said after "God Jul" or "Hyggelig Jul".

"God Jul" and "Hyggelig Jul" can both be used as standalone phrases to wish someone a Merry Christmas, or they can be used as part of a longer sentence. For example, "Vi ønsker deg en God Jul og et Hyggelig Nyttår" meaning "We wish you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year".

Norwegian is a phonetic language, which means that words are pronounced exactly as they are written. Therefore, when say Merry Christmas in Norwegian, it is pronounced as "Goh-dee-yool" for "God Jul" and "HYEH-gel-ig yool" for "Hyggelig Jul".

How do you say "Merry Christmas" in Norwegian?

In Norwegian, you say "God Jul" to wish someone a Merry Christmas. Jul is the Norwegian word for Christmas, and God is pronounced like the English word "good." So, to wish someone a Merry Christmas in Norwegian, you say "God Jul!"

How do you say "Happy New Year" in Norwegian?

Happy New Year in Norwegian is "Godt nytt år". There are a few different ways to say it, depending on who you're talking to.

If you're talking to a friend or family member, you can say "Godt nytt år" or "Lykke til i det nye året".

If you're talking to someone you don't know well, you can say "Lykke til i det nye året".

To say "Happy New Year" to someone in a more formal setting, you can say "Ære være det nye året".

How do you say "Happy Easter" in Norwegian?

Easter is a Christian holiday that celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ. The holiday is observed by Christians around the world, and in Norway, the day is called Paaske. On Paaske, Norwegians traditionally attend church, exchange Easter eggs, and enjoy a holiday meal with friends and family.

The word for "Easter" in Norwegian is Paaske, and the word for "Happy Easter" is "God Paaske". To wish someone a "Happy Easter", you would say "God Paaske til deg".

How do you say "Happy Thanksgiving" in Norwegian?

HAPPY THANKSGIVING IN NORWEGIAN

Happy Thanksgiving to all our readers in Norway! We hope you have a lovely day surrounded by family and friends, and enjoy all the delicious food that comes with this special holiday.

For those of you who are wondering, Thanksgiving is not widely celebrated in Norway. However, many Norwegians are familiar with the holiday and its traditions, thanks to movies, TV shows, and the internet.

So, how do you say "Happy Thanksgiving" in Norwegian?

The most direct translation would be "God Thanksgiving", but this is not typically used in Norway. A more common way to say it would be "Ha en god Thanksgiving" or "God Thanksgiving-feiring", which basically means "Have a good Thanksgiving celebration".

Another option would be to use the Norwegian word for "wish", which is "ønske". So you could say "Ønsker alle en fin Thanksgiving" or "Ønsker dere alle en god Thanksgiving".

If you want to get creative, you could also incorporate some of the traditional Thanksgiving foods into your greeting. For example, "God turkey-dag" (Happy Turkey Day) or "God Thanksgiving med stuffing og pai" (Happy Thanksgiving with stuffing and pie).

Whatever way you choose to say it, we hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving!

How do you say "Happy Hanukkah" in Norwegian?

Although it is not one of the most commonly spoken languages, Norwegian is the official language of Norway. With that in mind, Happy Hanukkah would be translated to "God jul og godt nyttår" in Norwegian.

Just as in English, there are multiple ways to say "Happy Hanukkah" in Norwegian. For example, one could say "Gamle år og nye år" which means "Old years and new years." Other variations include "Årets høytider" which means "The year's holidays" and "Lykke til i det nye året" which means "Good luck in the new year."

No matter how you choose to say it, wishing someone a Happy Hanukkah in Norwegian is sure to fill them with holiday cheer!

How do you say "Happy Kwanzaa" in Norwegian?

Happy Kwanzaa is said "God Jul" in Norwegian. This phrase is used during the winter holidays, but can be said any time of year. Norwegian is spoken by about 5 million people in Norway, making it the official language of the country. There are two different written forms of Norwegian, Bokmål and Nynorsk. Bokmål is used by about 85% of the population, and Nynorsk by about 15%.

How do you say "Happy Birthday" in Norwegian?

Happy birthday in Norwegian is "lykke til på fødselsdagen"! (pronounced "LEE-keh too poh FYOOR-dsells-dah-gen") You can also say "gratulerer med dagen" (pronounced "grah-TOO-leh-reh mehd DAH-gen"), which means "congratulations on the day." If you know someone who is Norwegian, or learning Norwegian, be sure to wish them a happy birthday in their language!

How do you say "Happy Valentine's Day" in Norwegian?

Norway is a land of many traditions, and one of the most special days in the Norwegian calendar is Valentine's Day. On this day, people all across the country exchange heartfelt gifts and cards with their loved ones. And of course, one of the most important things to do on Valentine's Day is to wish your loved ones a happy day!

So how do you say "Happy Valentine's Day" in Norwegian?

Well, the most common way to say it is "God Valentinsdag!" which literally translates to "Good Valentine's Day."

Other ways to say it include "Lykke til på Valentinsdag!" which means "Good luck on Valentine's Day!" and "Ha en fin Valentinsdag!" which means "Have a nice Valentine's Day!"

Whatever way you choose to say it, just make sure you add a heartwarming smile and a big hug to go along with it!

How do you say "Happy St. Patrick's Day" in Norwegian?

Happy St. Patrick's Day is celebrated in Norway on March 17th. The day is also known as National Day, and is a time for everyone to celebrate Norwegian culture and heritage. The most common way to say "Happy St. Patrick's Day" in Norwegian is "God St. Patrick's Dag." Other ways to say this include "Gratulerer med St. Patrick's Dag" and " Lykke til på St. Patrick's Day."

Related Questions

How do you say Happy New Year in Norwegian?

In Norwegian, to say Happy New Year, you would say “Godt Nytt År”.

How do you wish someone Merry Christmas and Happy New Year?

God Jul og Gott Nytt År!

How much marzipan do Norwegians eat at Christmas?

According to Nizar, Norwegians consume around 40 million pieces of marzipan figures over the Christmas period.

What do Norwegians do on New Year's Eve?

Norwegians traditionally gather with friends or family to welcome the New Year. Often a big dinner is held followed by a late night fireworks display.

When do you say “Frohes Neues Jahr” in German?

Frohes Neues Jahr is typically used on New Year's Eve.

How do you say Happy New Year in Norwegian?

The basic form is “Gott nyt år”, but depending on the region you’re in, there are a few variations. If you live in Oslo, for example, you will say “Godt nytt år”. Elsewhere in Norway, people might say either “Gud Nytt År” (GOD-nittur) or simply “Nytt År”. In Trondheim, people usually say “fredagsnyttår” which means “Friday New Year”. What about beyond Norway? Swedes will say “Dagens Nyttår” and Danes will say “Aftens Nyttår” – these two words mean “New Year Evening/Night” respectively.

How do you wish someone Merry Christmas and Happy New Year?

"Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!"

How much marzipan do Norwegians eat at Christmas?

estimates say that Norwegians consume around 40 million pieces of marzipan over the Christmas period!

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