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How do you say here in german?

Category: How

Author: Ricky Martinez

Published: 2020-09-02

Views: 261

How do you say here in german?

"Here" can be translated to German in a few different ways, depending on the context. The most common translation is "hier", but it can also be translated as "da" or "dort", depending on the situation.

"Hier" is the most common translation for "here", and is typically used when referring to a location that is close by. For example, if you are standing in a room and want to indicate that you are here, you would say "Ich bin hier" (I am here).

"Da" is another word that can be used for "here", but it is typically used when referring to a location that is not as close by. For example, if you are standing in a room and want to indicate that the door is over there, you would say "Die Tür ist da" (The door is over there).

"Dort" is another word that can be used for "here", but it is typically used when referring to a location that is far away. For example, if you are standing in a room and want to indicate that the exit is over there, you would say "Der Ausgang ist dort" (The exit is over there).

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How do you say "here" in German?

The word "here" can be translated to German in a few different ways, depending on the context in which it is used.

If you are inquiring about the location of something or someone, you would say " Wo ist das/die/der...?" which translates to "Where is the/the/the...?"

If you are trying to establish your own location, you would say "Ich bin hier." This means "I am here."

If you are offering something to someone or motioning for them to come over to you, you would say "Komm hierher!" This means "Come here!"

Lastly, if you are emphasizing that something is located in a certain place, you would say "Hier ist das/die/der..." which translates to "Here is the/the/the..."

So as you can see, the word "here" can be translated in a few different ways depending on the context in which it is used.

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How do you say "there" in German?

"There" in German is "da". This word can be used as an adverb, pronoun, or noun. When used as an adverb, it generally means "over there" or "in that direction". It can also be used to describe an action that is happening far away. For example, "Ich sehe da ein Tier" would mean "I see a animal over there". When used as a pronoun, "da" replaces the noun in a sentence. For example, "Das ist mein Buch" would mean "That is my book". And finally, when used as a noun, "da" means "the" as in "in the". For example, "Ich bin in der Schule" would mean "I am in the school".

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How do you say "where" in German?

The word "where" in German is "wo". It is a very simple word that is used often in everyday conversation. There are many different ways to say it, depending on the context.

For example, if you are asking someone for directions, you would say "Wo ist die Bushaltestelle?" (Where is the bus stop?). If you are asking someone where they are from, you would say "Woher kommst du?" (Where are you from?).

There are many other ways to use the word "wo" in German, but these are just a few examples. Learning the different ways to say "where" in German will help you to become more fluent in the language and be able to communicate more easily with native speakers.

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How do you say "when" in German?

The word for "when" in German is "wann." It can be used in a variety of ways, depending on the context. For example, you might use it to ask someone when they're available to meet, as in "Wann hast du Zeit?" ("When do you have time?") Alternatively, you might use it to ask someone when an event will take place, as in "Wann fängt das Spiel an?" ("When does the game start?")

"Wann" can also be used to indicate that something happened at a specific time in the past. For example, you might say "Ich habe ihn gestern gesehen" ("I saw him yesterday").

Finally, "wann" can be used to ask a question about the timing of something. For example, you might ask "Wann sollen wir losfahren?" ("When should we leave?").

No matter how you use it, "wann" is a essential word to know in German.

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How do you say "who" in German?

Who in German is "wer" if you are referring to a person, and "was" if you are referring to an inanimate object. There are a few different ways you can say "who" in German, depending on the context. Let's take a look at a few example sentences to see how "wer" and "was" are used.

"Wer ist das?" - "Who is that?"

This is the most basic way to ask "who" in German. You simply take the word "wer" and add the verb "ist" to it, conjugating the verb to agree with the subject. In this example, "was" would not be used, as we are asking about a person.

"Wem gehört dieses Haus?" - "Who does this house belong to?"

Here, we are asking about an inanimate object, specifically a house. The word "wem" is the dative form of "wer", and is used when the subject of the sentence is the recipient of something. In this sentence, "wem" takes the place of "to whom" in English.

"Mit wem hast du gestern Abend gesprochen?" - "Who did you talk to yesterday evening?"

This sentence is similar to the first one, but uses the word "mit" instead of "ist". This is because we are using the verb "sprechen", which is a ditransitive verb. This means that there are two objects in the sentence - the person you are talking to, and the person you are talking about. The first object is always in the dative case, and the second is in the accusative. In this sentence, the word "wem" would not be used, as it would imply that the person you are talking to is the subject of the sentence, when in fact they are the object.

"Wer hat das gemacht?" - "Who did this?"

This sentence is in the past tense, so the verb "haben" is used instead of "ist". The word "wer" does not change in the past tense.

"Was ist das?" - "What is that?"

This is the most basic way to ask "what" in German. As we are asking about an inanimate object, the word

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How do you say "what" in German?

In German, the word "what" is generally translated as "was" or "was für". These are the two most common ways to say "what" in German.

The word "was" is the most basic way to say "what". It is a one-word question that can be used in almost any situation. For example, you could say "Was ist das?" (What is that?) or "Was machen Sie?" (What are you doing?).

The word "was für" is a little more formal than "was" and is typically used when you are asking about someone or something specific. For example, you might say "Was für ein Tier ist das?" (What kind of animal is that?) or "Was für ein Mensch ist er?" (What sort of person is he?).

Both "was" and "was für" can be used as pronouns, so you can use them to start a sentence without a noun. For example, you could say "Was willst du?" (What do you want?) or "Was für eine Farbe ist das?" (What color is that?).

Finally, it's worth mentioning that the word "what" can also be translated as "welch" in some situations. This word is typically only used in written German, and it is usually only used when referring to something good or impressive. For example, you might say "Welch ein schöner Tag!" (What a beautiful day!).

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How do you say "which" in German?

In German, the word "which" is typically used as an adjective, and therefore has different forms depending on whether it is used as a masculine, feminine, or neuter word. When "which" is used as a pronoun, only the neuter form is used.

When "which" is used as a masculine adjective, it is spelled "welcher." When "which" is used as a feminine adjective, it is spelled "welche." When "which" is used as a neuter adjective, it is spelled "welches." The plural forms of "which" are "welche" for all genders.

The word "which" is also commonly used as a pronoun in German. When used as a pronoun, it always takes the neuter form, "welches." The plural form of "which" used as a pronoun is "welche."

Here are some examples of how "which" is used in German:

Masculine: Welcher Mann kommt zur Party? (Which man is coming to the party?)

Feminine: Welche Frau kommt zur Party? (Which woman is coming to the party?)

Neuter: Welches Kind kommt zur Party? (Which child is coming to the party?)

Plural: Welche Kinder kommen zur Party? (Which children are coming to the party?)

Pronoun: Welches Kind kommt zur Party? (Which child is coming to the party?)

Plural pronoun: Welche Kinder kommen zur Party? (Which children are coming to the party?)

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How do you say "whose" in German?

The German word for "whose" is "weniger." It is a possessive pronoun that is used to indicate something that belongs to someone or something. For example, if you were looking at a picture of a group of people and you wanted to know who owned the camera that was in the photo, you would say "Weniger nimmt die Kamera?" This would literally translate to "Less takes the camera?" but it is the German way of asking "Who owns the camera?"

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How do you say "why" in German?

When you want to ask a question in German, you typically need to put the word "warum" at the beginning of the question. For example, the question "Why are you here?" would be "Warum bist du hier?" You can also use "warum" to ask for clarification about something. For example, if someone said "Ich habe ein Buch," you could ask "Warum?" and they would hopefully clarify that they have a book.

"Warum" can also be used as a standalone exclamation. For example, if you saw a cat walking on your keyboard, you might say "Warum!?," meaning "Why?!".

Asking "why" in German can be a little bit tricky, because there are a few different words that can all be translated to "why" in English. The most common one is "warum," but you may also hear people use the words "wieso" or "weshalb." All of these words have slightly different meanings, so it's important to choose the right one for the situation.

"Warum" is the most straightforward translation of "why." It can be used in pretty much any situation where you would use "why" in English.

"Wieso" is a bit more colloquial, and is often used in situations where you already know the answer to the question, but you want to hear it from the other person. For example, if you saw someone trip and fall, you might say "Wieso hast du das gemacht?" ("Why did you do that?"), even though you know they didn't do it on purpose.

"Weshalb" is similar to "wieso," but is a bit more formal. You might use it in a business setting or in writing, but it's not as common in everyday conversation.

No matter which word you choose, remember that the word order in German questions is a bit different than it is in English. In English, we typically ask questions by putting the question word at the beginning, followed by the subject. In German, the word order is reversed, so the subject comes first, followed by the question word. For example, the English question "Why are you here?" would be translated to "Warum bist du hier?" in German.

One last thing to keep in mind is

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Related Questions

What to say in German when sightseeing in Germany?

Entschuldigung, können Sie mir sagen, wo das Museum/den Park/das Hotel ist? – Excuse me, can you tell me where the museum/park/hotel is? Ich suche es gerade. – I'm looking for it right now. Wo ist es denn genau? – Where exactly is it?

Should you use idioms and phrases when speaking German?

Absolutely! You’ll sound more like a native speaker and people will be more likely to understand you. Make sure, however, that you know the appropriate idioms and phrases for the situation you’re in. For example, in order to say “I can’t believe it” in German, one would say Ich kann es kaum glauben (literally: “I can hardly believe it”). However, if you want to congratulate someone on their new job, one might instead say haben Sie Ihren neuen Job gewonnen (literally: “have you won your new job”). It all depends on the context!

How can I learn German phrases quickly and easily?

With Absolute Beginner German, you can learn the best German phrases in minutes – not hours or days. Utilizing our popular 400+ video database and our patented interactive subtitles and flashcards, learning German becomes a fun and easy process. Plus, our fun quizzes make sure you remember what you’ve learned!

What are the most important things to know when visiting Germany?

Germany has a diverse geography and culture, which makes it an interesting destination for visitors from all over the world. Here are some of the most important things to know before travelling to Germany: 1. The currency in Germany is the Euro (€). Cash is widely accepted, with credit cards becoming more and more common. However, it is always best to have some cash on hand as prices can vary significantly between cities. 2. Speed limits in Germany are generally relatively low compared to other European countries, butdriving habits are generally quite safe and predictable. Be sure to drive calmly and obey traffic laws at all times! 3. Germans are generally punctual and expect others to be as well. If you have an appointment, make sure to arrive a few minutes earlier and allow for extra time for traffic or in case public transport is late. 4. Punctuality is especially important when it comes to doing business in Germany –don’t put off making

What are some German phrases to know before visiting?

Here are 10 phrases to know before visiting Germany: 1. Danke – Thank you. This is the simplest way Germans say thanks. You'll find that Germans used to be more formal, but nowadays it's okay to keep it informal. 2. Grüß Gott – Good day/goodbye. Greeting between people in Germany. It's customary to say “Gute Nacht” when leaving someone alone. 3. Tschüss – Good bye. Generally said when leaving someone or when you are about to leave a place yourself. 4. Ihr seid uns ein großer Verstärker gewesen - You have been a great amplifier for us. commonly used as a form of gratitude by a business person or someone who has been helped out in some way by another person/business/organization. Example: We would like to thank you for your help! 5.

How do you Say Good Morning in German?

Es tut mir leid, ich weiß nicht, wie man sagt: Guten Morgen

How do you Say Good bye in German?

“Auf Wiedersehen!”

How do you say Happy Birthday in German?

Hej, ich wünsche Dir einen tollen Geburtstag! > Hi, I wish you a great birthday!

How do you celebrate birthdays in Germany?

One tradition that Germans follow on birthdays is to avoid wishing anyone "happy birthday" before their actual birthday. Alternatively, the person celebrating their birthday may throw their own party, and expect the person celebrating their birthday to bring their own cake. Additionally, Germans commonly sing the traditional "happy birthday" song in German.

What is Geburtstag in German?

It means "birthday."

Are Germans serious about birthdays?

Birthdays are definitely a big deal in Germany. As the 94-year-old man who busted out of a Munich hospital to head to a beer hall on his Geburtstag could tell you, Germans are serious about birthdays. German culture embraces celebrating birthdays with family and friends, whether it’s at home or in a public setting such as a beer hall. Many Germans even make special preparations for their birthdays, like baking cakes or coming up with creative gift ideas.

Should you use idioms and phrases when studying German?

There's no strict rule as to whether or not you should use idioms and phrases when studying German, but using them will make you sound more knowledgeable and fluent. Additionally, using local expressions can give you a better understanding of the culture and help you to connect with Germans in a more natural way.

What are some good German phrases to learn when speaking German?

Wie geht's? - How are you? Wo steckst du? - Where are you located? Haben Sie Hunger? - Do you have hunger?

How to start a conversation with a German speaker?

1. Guten Morgen! 2. Hallo! 3. Schönen Tag!

How to use idioms to improve your German?

Here are a few classic idioms useful for speaking German with fluency: Ach so! (Oh, really!) Das ist ja ne tolle Nachricht! (That’s wonderful news!) Ja, natürlich! (Of course!) So etwas habe ich noch nie gehört! (I’ve never heard anything like that!) Es tut mir leid aber... (I’m sorry but...)

What to say in German when sightseeing in Germany?

Entschuldigung, ich suche das Museum/den Park/das Hotel.

What are some German sayings for beer?

Guten Abend, ein Bier bitte! -Good evening, could I have a beer please? Herr Kommissar, ich rate Ihnen einen Doppelten! -Mr. Detective, may I recommend you have a double? Ich kaufe mir mein Bier selbst. -I buy my beer myself. Herr und Frau Kommissar, wir brauchen etwas zu essen! -Mr. and Mrs. Detective, we need to eat something! Vielen Dank! -Thank you very much! Schönen Tag noch! -Good day still!

How can I learn German phrases quickly and easily?

By using the interactive subtitles, flashcards and quizzes!

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